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  • 24 Hours in Nowhere

    By: Dusti Bowling
    Recommended for grade(s): 6

    Welcome to Nowhere, Arizona, the least livable town in the United States. For Gus, a bright 13-year-old with dreams of getting out and going to college, life there is made even worse by Bo Taylor, Nowhere’s biggest, baddest bully. When Bo tries to force Gus to eat a dangerously spiny cactus, Rossi Scott, one of the best racers in Nowhere, comes to his rescue–but in return she has to give Bo her prized dirt bike. Determined to buy it back, Gus agrees to go searching for gold in Dead Frenchman Mine, joined by his old friends Jessie Navarro and Matthew Dufort, and Rossi herself. As they hunt for treasure, narrowly surviving everything from cave-ins to mountain lions, they bond over shared stories of how hard life in Nowhere is–and they realize this adventure just may be their way out.  –From Thorndike


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  • Recommended for grade(s): 4

    To heartwarming cheer, Alan Cole came out to his school. But now what? In this follow-up novel to Alan Cole Is Not a Coward, Eric Bell deftly explores with nuance and humor how the first step to complete self-acceptance may mean actually putting your feet on the dance floor. This laugh-out-loud and poignant tale is perfect for fans of Gary Schmidt and Jerry Spinelli. Alan Cole has a problem: Ron McCaughlin. Ever since Alan revealed he’s gay, Ron has been bullying Alan with relentless fury. Alan can’t tell his parents why he’s really coming home with bruises—because they still don’t know the truth about him. Yet buoyed by the support of his classmates and with his friends Zack and Madison by his side, Alan thinks he can withstand the bullying and—just maybe—break through to Ron. But all things come to a head when Alan’s father asks that he take June Harrison to the upcoming Winter Dance. Never mind that Alan has two left feet, does not like girls, and might be developing feelings for a new boy at school. This resounding tale about friendship, family, and the many meanings of bravery will leave readers rooting for Alan and his gang of proud misfits once more. — From HarperCollins

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 3

    Katie Kazoo, Switcheroo Series, Book One. Katie Carew, nicknamed Katie Kazoo by the class bully, had no idea what would happen when she wished that she could be anyone but herself. But now her wish has come true, and-switcheroo!-she keeps turning into other people and even animals! What is one ordinary third-grade girl with a really extraordinary problem to do? —from the website at Penguin Random House

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  • Attack Of The Tagger (Shredderman #2)

    By: Wendelin Van Draanen
    Recommended for grade(s): 4

    Nolan Byrd single-handedly saved his school from the bullydom of Alvin “Bubba” Bixby. He posted proof of Bubba’s exploits on the Web at Shredderman.com. Now Shredderman is the school hero! But since Shredderman’s identity is a secret, everyone still treats Nolan like . . . a nerd. But inside this nerd beats a superhero’s heart—one dedicated to truth and justice. So when a vandal spray-paints graffiti around town—and even on his teacher’s van!—Nolan decides that tracking down the tagger is a job for Shredderman.—from the website at Penguin Random House

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 5

    Over 6 million people have read the #1 New York Times bestseller Wonder and have fallen in love with Auggie Pullman, an ordinary boy with an extraordinary face. Auggie & Me gives readers a special look at Auggie’s world through three new points of view. These stories are an extra peek at Auggie before he started at Beecher Prep and during his first year there. Readers get to see him through the eyes of Julian, the bully; Christopher, Auggie’s oldest friend; and Charlotte, Auggie’s new friend at school. Together, these three stories are a treasure for readers who don’t want to leave Auggie behind when they finish Wonder. — From Knopf Books for Young Readers

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 6, 7

    From toxic family environments to harassment in the workplace and cyberbullying, LGBTQ+ teens often face bullying beyond the schoolyard. This text explores the issues and lets teens know they’re not alone when dealing with this mistreatment. Giving guidance to bystanders as well as targets, the title includes suggestions for educating families and communities that members of the LGBTQ+ community deserve the same rights and protections as other people. Targets of bullying can find encouragement along with ideas and resources on how to change their situation and heal from the damage caused by aggression and harassment. –from The Rosen Publishing Group.

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  • Because of Mister Terupt

    By: Rob Buyea
    Recommended for grade(s): 4, 5

    It’s the start of fifth grade for seven kids at Snow Hill School. There’s Jessica, the new girl, smart and perceptive, who s having a hard time fitting in; Alexia, a bully, your friend one second, your enemy the next; Peter, class prankster and troublemaker; Luke, the brain; Danielle, who never stands up for herself; shy Anna, whose home situation makes her an outcast; and Jeffrey, who hates school. Only Mr. Terupt, their new and energetic teacher, seems to know how to deal with them all. He makes the classroom a fun place, even if he doesn’t let them get away with much . . . until the snowy winter day when an accident changes everything and everyone. –from Yearling Books.

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 8, 9

    Jazz Jennings is one of the youngest and most prominent voices in the national discussion about gender identity. At the age of five, Jazz transitioned to life as a girl, with the support of her parents. A year later, her parents allowed her to share her incredible journey in her first Barbara Walters interview, aired at a time when the public was much less knowledgeable or accepting of the transgender community. This groundbreaking interview was followed over the years by other high-profile interviews, a documentary, the launch of her YouTube channel, a picture book, and her own reality TV series–I Am Jazz–making her one of the most recognizable activists for transgender teens, children, and adults. In her remarkable memoir, Jazz reflects on these very public experiences and how they have helped shape the mainstream attitude toward the transgender community. But it hasn’t all been easy. Jazz has faced many challenges, bullying, discrimination, and rejection, yet she perseveres as she educates others about her life as a transgender teen. Through it all, her family has been beside her on this journey, standing together against those who don’t understand the true meaning of tolerance and unconditional love. Now Jazz must learn to navigate the physical, social, and emotional upheavals of adolescence–particularly high school–complicated by the unique challenges of being a transgender teen. Making the journey from girl to woman is never easy–especially when you began your life in a boy’s body.  –From Ember

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  • Black River Falls

    By: Jeff Hirsch
    Recommended for grade(s): 7

    Seventeen-year-old Cardinal has escaped the virus that ravaged his town, leaving its victims alive but without their memories. He chooses to remain in the quarantined zone, caring for a group of orphaned kids in a mountain camp with the help of the former brutal school bully, now transformed by the virus into his best friend. But then a strong-willed and mysterious young woman appears, and the closed-off world Cardinal has created begins to crumble. A thrilling, fast-paced work of speculative fiction for teens, from a bestselling author, Black River Falls is an unforgettable story about survival, identity, and family. — From Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

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  • Bluebird

    By: Bob Staake
    Recommended for grade(s): 3

    In his most beautiful and moving work to date, Bob Staake explores the universal themes of loneliness, bullying, and the importance of friendship. In this emotional picture book, readers will be captivated as they follow the journey of a bluebird as he develops a friendship with a young boy and ultimately risks his life to save the boy from harm. Both simple and evocative, this timeless and profound story will resonate with readers young and old. Bob Staake has been working on this book for 10 years, and he believes it is the story he was born to write. –From the website at Penguin Random House

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  • Booked

    By: Kwame Alexander
    Recommended for grade(s): 5, 6, 7

    Soccer, family, love, and friendship, take center stage as twelve-year-old Nick learns the power of words as he wrestles with problems at home, stands up to a bully, and tries to impress the girl of his dreams. —from the website at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

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  • Boxers

    By: Gene Leun Yang
    Recommended for grade(s): 7, 8, 9, 10

    China, 1898. Bands of foreign missionaries and soldiers roam the countryside, bullying and robbing Chinese peasants. Little Bao has had enough. Harnessing the powers of ancient Chinese gods, he recruits an army of Boxers – commoners trained in kung fu who fight to free China from “foreign devils.” Against all odds, this grass-roots rebellion is violently successful. But nothing is simple. Little Bao is fighting for the glory of China, but at what cost? So many are dying, including thousands of “secondary devils” – Chinese citizens who have converted to Christianity. National Book Award Winner.  Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist. —from the website at Macmillan

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  • Brick Lane

    By: Monica Ali
    Recommended for grade(s): 12, College Plus

    After an arranged marriage to Chanu, a man twenty years older, Nazneen is taken to London, leaving her home and heart in the Bangladeshi village where she was born. Her new world is full of mysteries. How can she cross the road without being hit by a car (an operation akin to dodging raindrops in the monsoon)? What is the secret of her bullying neighbor Mrs. Islam? What is a Hell’s Angel? And how must she comfort the naïve and disillusioned Chanu? As a good Muslim girl, Nazneen struggles to not question why things happen. She submits, as she must, to Fate and devotes herself to her husband and daughters. Yet to her amazement, she begins an affair with a handsome young radical, and her erotic awakening throws her old certainties into chaos. Monica Ali’s splendid novel is about journeys both external and internal, where the marvelous and the terrifying spiral together. –From the website at Simon & Schuster

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  • Bruiser

    By: Neil Shusterman
    Recommended for grade(s): 8, 9, 10

    Tennyson is not surprised, really, when his family begins to fall apart, or when his twin sister, Brontë, starts dating the misunderstood bully, Brewster (or The Bruiser, as the entire high school calls him). Tennyson is determined to get to the bottom of The Bruiser’s reputation, even if it means gearing up for a fight. Brontë, on the other hand, thinks there’s something special underneath that tough exterior. And she’s right…but neither she nor Tennyson is prepared for the truth of what lies below the surface. Told through Tennyson, Brontë, and Bruiser’s points of view, this dark, twisting novel explores friendship, family, and the sacrifices we make for the people we love. –From the website at HarperCollins

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  • Bully for You, Teddy Roosevelt!

    By: Jean Fritz and Mike Wimmer
    Recommended for grade(s): 4, 5, 6

    Newbery Honor-winning author and preeminent biographer for young people, Jean Fritz, brings to life our colorful 26th president. Conservationist, hunter, family man, and politician, Teddy Roosevelt commanded the respect and admiration of many who marveled at his energy, drive and achievements. –From the website at Penguin Random House

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  • Captain Superlative

    By: J. S. Puller
    Recommended for grade(s): 6

    “Have no fear, citizens! Captain Superlative is here to make all troubles disappear!” Red mask, blue wig, silver swimsuit, rubber gloves, torn tights, high top sneakers and . . . a cape? Who would run through the halls of Deerwood Park Middle School dressed like this? And why? Janey—quick to stay in the shadows—can’t resist the urge to uncover the truth behind the mask. The answer pulls invisible Janey into the spotlight and leads her to an unexpected friendship with a superhero like no other. Fearless even in the face of school bully extraordinaire, Dagmar Hagen, no good deed is too small for the incomparable Captain Superlative and her new sidekick, Janey. But superheroes hold secrets and Captain Superlative is no exception. When Janey unearths what’s truly at stake, she’s forced to face her own dark secrets and discover what it truly means to be a hero . . . and a friend. Debut author J.S. Puller delivers an inspirational story full of heart, humor, and breathtaking revelations. — From Disney Hyperion

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  • Cardboard

    By: Doug Tennapel
    Recommended for grade(s): 4, 5, 6

    When cardboard creatures come magically to life, a boy must save his town from disaster. After Cam’s down-and-out father gives him a cardboard box for his birthday, they fashion it into a man and it comes magically to life. But things spin wildly out of control when the neighborhood bully, Marcus, steals a scrap of the cardboard to create creatures that promptly disobey his orders and multiply into an unruly army. Before long, Cam and Marcus must put their differences behind them and work together to prevent a legion of cardboard monsters from taking over the whole town! –From the website at Scholastic

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  • Coldfinger (Zinc Alloy)

    By: Donald Lemke
    Recommended for grade(s): 3

    It’s winter vacation, and Zack Allen’s family is headed to the mountains. When Zack arrives, Johnny, the school’s biggest bully, tricks him into entering the annual ski competition. While on the slopes, however, Zack discovers an even greater problem ― an evil villain is building a giant freeze ray within the mountain. Now Zinc must stop his evil plans and take home the ski trophy. –From Capstone

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  • Crash

    By: Jerry Spinelli
    Recommended for grade(s): 5, 6

    Cocky seventh-grade super-jock Crash Coogan got his nickname the day he used his first football helmet to knock his cousin Bridget flat on her backside. And he has been running over people ever since, especially Penn Webb, the dweeby, vegetarian Quaker kid who lives down the block. Through the eyes of Crash, readers get a rare glimpse into the life of a bully in this unforgettable and beloved story about stereotypes and the surprises life can bring. —from the website at Penguin Random House

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 6, 7, 8

    Danny Blackgoat is a teenager in 1864 Navajo country when United States soldiers burn down his home, kill his sheep, capture his family, and force them all to walk at gun point to an Army fort far from their homeland. This forced exodus of the Navajo people was called the Long Walk of 1864, and during the journey, Danny is labeled a troublemaker and given the name Fire Eye. Refusing to accept captivity, he is sent to Fort Davis,Texas, a Civil War prisoner outpost. There he battles bullying fellow prisoners, rattlesnakes, and abusive soldiers, until he meets Jim Davis. Davis teaches Danny how to hold his anger and starts him on the road to literacy. In a stunning climax, Davis, who builds coffins for the dead, aids Danny in a daring and dangerous escape. Set in troubled times, Danny Blackgoat, Navajo Prisoner is the story of one boy’s hunger to be free and to be Navajo. . American Indian Youth Literature Award 2014 Honoree. –From Seventh Generation Books

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  • Dead Ends

    By: Erin Jade Lange
    Recommended for grade(s): 8, 9

    A riddle rarely makes sense the first time you hear it. The connection between Dane, a bully, and Billy D, a guy with Down Syndrome, doesn’t even make sense the second time you hear it. But it’s a collection of riddles that solidify their unlikely friendship. Dane doesn’t know who his dad is. Billy doesn’t know where his dad is. So when Billy asks for Dane’s help solving the riddles his dad left in an atlas, Dane can’t help but agree. The unmarked towns lead them closer to secrets of the past. But there’s one secret Billy isn’t sharing. It’s a secret Dane might have liked to know before he stole his mom’s car and her lottery winnings and set off on a road trip that will put him face to face with Billy’s dad. –from Bloomsbury Publishing.

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 7, 8, 9

    Today’s top authors for teens and young people come together to share their stories about bullying—as bystanders, as victims, and as the bullies themselves—in this moving and deeply personal collection. Lauren Oliver, R. L. Stine, Ellen Hopkins, Carolyn Mackler, Kiersten White, Mo Willems, Jon Scieszka, Lauren Kate, and many more contributed 70 heartfelt and empathetic stories from each corner of the schoolyard. In addition, Dear Bully includes resources for teens, educators, and parents, and suggestions for further reading. —from the HarperCollins website

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  • Dear Nobody: The True Diary of Mary Rose

    By: Gillian McCain, Legs McNeil
    Recommended for grade(s): 9, 10

    Fans of Go Ask Alice will devour Dear Nobody, a real teen’s diary, so raw and so edgy that it’s authenticity rings off every page. They say that high school is supposed to be the best time of your life. But what if that’s just not true? More than anything, Mary Rose wants to fit in. To be loved. And she’ll do whatever it takes to make that happen. Even if it costs her her life. Told through the raw and unflinching diary entries of a real teen, Mary Rose struggles with addiction, bullying, and a deadly secret. Her compelling story will inspire readers–and remind them that they are not alone. –from Sourcebooks.

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  • Diary of a Witness

    By: Catherine Ryan Hyde
    Recommended for grade(s): 7, 8

    One day, something’s going to snap. . . . Ernie doesn’t have a lot of friends at school. Just Will. They have stuff in common—like fishing. But more important, they have common enemies: the school jocks, who seem to find bullying just another sport. For the most part, Ernie and Will take life at high school in stride. Until Will has one very bad day. Now nothing is remotely funny. Ernie finds himself a witness—to loss, to humiliation, and to Will’s anger—an anger that’s building each and every moment. Ernie doesn’t want to believe his best friend is changing, but he can’t deny the truth. Soon he has a choice: join or die. Or can he find another way? Praise for The Day I Killed James: “Teens who have experienced crushing rejection or who have laughed at the ardent feelings of a classmate will devour this original, gripping story.”—Kirkus Reviews From the Hardcover edition. –From Knopf

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  • Dream on, Amber

    By: Emma Shevah
    Recommended for grade(s): 4, 5

    Amber Alessandra Leola Kimiko Miyamoto (yes – really!) is feeling bad. She’s started a new school, is being picked on by a bully, and only has a caveman phone for company. But the hardest thing about being Amber is that a big part of her life is missing. Her dad. He left when she was little, and he’s never coming back. But Amber has one thing on her side: she’s a girl with a BIG imagination…. —from the Scholastic website

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  • Eight Keys

    By: Suzanne LaFleur
    Recommended for grade(s): 5, 6, 7

    Elise and Franklin have always been best friends. Elise has always lived in the big house with her loving Uncle and Aunt, because Elise’s parents died when she was too young to remember them. There’s always been a barn behind the house with eight locked doors on the second floor. When Elise and Franklin start middle school, things feel all wrong. Bullying. Not fitting in. Franklin suddenly seems babyish. Then, soon after her 12th birthday, Elise receives a mysterious key left for her by her father. A key that unlocks one of the eight doors upstairs in the bar . . .. —from the website at Penguin Random House

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  • Everybody Sees the Ants

    By: A.S. King
    Recommended for grade(s): 10, 11, 12

    Lucky Linderman didn’t ask for his life. He didn’t ask his grandfather not to come home from the Vietnam War. He didn’t ask for a father who never got over it. He didn’t ask for a mother who keeps pretending their dysfunctional family is fine. And he didn’t ask to be the target of Nader McMillan’s relentless bullying, which has finally gone too far. But Lucky has a secret—one that helps him wade through the mundane torture of his life. In his dreams, Lucky escapes to the war-ridden jungles of Laos—the prison his grandfather couldn’t escape—where Lucky can be a real man, an adventurer, and a hero. It’s dangerous and wild, and it’s a place where his life just might be worth living. But how long can Lucky keep hiding in his dreams before reality forces its way inside? ALA and YALSA Top Ten Best Fiction 2012. —from the website at Hachette

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  • Fat Angie: Rebel Girl Revolution

    By: E. E. Charlton-Trujillo
    Recommended for grade(s): 9

    More trouble at school and at home — and the discovery of a missive from her late soldier sister — send Angie and a long-ago friend on an RV road trip across Ohio. Sophomore year has just begun, and Angie is miserable. Her girlfriend, KC, has moved away; her good friend, Jake, is keeping his distance; and the resident bully has ramped up an increasingly vicious and targeted campaign to humiliate her. An over-the-top statue dedication planned for her sister, who died in Iraq, is almost too much to bear, and it doesn’t help that her mother has placed a symbolic empty urn on their mantel. At the ceremony, a soldier hands Angie a final letter from her sister, including a list of places she wanted the two of them to visit when she got home from the war. With her mother threatening to send Angie to a “treatment center” and the situation at school becoming violent, Angie enlists the help of her estranged childhood friend, Jamboree. Along with a few other outsiders, they pack into an RV and head across the state on the road trip Angie’s sister did not live to take. It might be just what Angie needs to find a way to let her sister go, and find herself in the process. — From Candlewick Press (MA)

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  • Fat Boy vs. the Cheerleaders

    By: Geoff Herbach
    Recommended for grade(s): 8, 9

    From Geoff Herbach, the award-winning author of the hit young adult novels Stupid Fast and Nothing Special, comes a tale that will resonate with fat kids, nerds, dorks, gamers, geeks and teen outcasts of all kinds-an authentically funny story for anyone who has suffered from teasing and bullying at the hands of the high school social hierarchy. And decided to do something about it. Join a cast of quirky misfits as fat boy Gabe, aka Chunk, goes up against the high school cheerleading team in a battle over control of the school’s soda machine. A marching band geek who drowns his dysfunctional family woes in a voracious soda habit, Gabe relishes his role as class clown, fending off harassment from students and teachers with his own brand of irreverent, self-deprecating humor. But when the cheerleading team takes over the funds previously collected by the band, Gabe will not stand for it. Something must be done. –From Sourcebooks, Inc

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  • Feathers

    By: Jacqueline Woodson
    Recommended for grade(s): 6

    “Hope is the thing with feathers” starts the poem Frannie is reading in school. Frannie hasn’t thought much about hope. There are so many other things to think about. Each day, her friend Samantha seems a bit more “holy.” There is a new boy in class everyone is calling the Jesus Boy. And although the new boy looks like a white kid, he says he’s not white. Who is he? During a winter full of surprises, good and bad, Frannie starts seeing a lot of things in a new light—her brother Sean’s deafness, her mother’s fear, the class bully’s anger, her best friend’s faith and her own desire for “the thing with feathers.” Jacqueline Woodson once again takes readers on a journey into a young girl’s heart and reveals the pain and the joy of learning to look beneath the surface. A Newbery Honor Book. —from the website at Penguin Random House

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  • Felix Yz

    By: Lisa Bunker
    Recommended for grade(s): 6, 7, 8

    “If it wasn’t for the fused-with-Zyx thing, I suppose I would just be normal–whatever that means.” When Felix Yz was three years old, a hyperintelligent fourth-dimensional being became fused inside him after one of his father’s science experiments went terribly wrong. The creature is friendly, but Felix–now thirteen–won’t be able to grow to adulthood while they’re still melded together. So a risky Procedure is planned to separate them . . . but it may end up killing them both instead. This book is Felix’s secret blog, a chronicle of the days leading up to the Procedure. Some days it’s business as usual–time with his close-knit family, run-ins with a bully at school, anxiety about his crush. But life becomes more out of the ordinary with the arrival of an Estonian chess Grandmaster, the revelation of family secrets, and a train-hopping journey. When it all might be over in a few days, what matters most? Told in an unforgettable voice full of heart and humor, Felix Yz is a groundbreaking story about how we are all separate, but all connected too. –From Viking

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 10, 11, 12

    Shy, intellectual, and living in rural Oregon, Triinu Hoffman just doesn’t fit in. She does her best to hide behind her dyed hair and black wardrobe, but it’s hard to ignore the bullying of Pip Weston and Principal Pinn. It’s even harder to ignore the allure of other girls. As Triinu tumbles headlong into first love and teenage independence, she realizes that the differences that make her a target are also the differences that can set her free. With everyone in town taking sides in the battle for equal rights in Oregon, Triinu must stand up for herself, learn what it is to love and have her heart broken, and become her own woman. Lambda Literary Award Honoree 2015. –From Ooligan Press

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