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  • Recommended for grade(s): 7, 8

    Maidens, monks, and millers’ sons — in these pages, readers will meet them all. There’s Hugo, the lord’s nephew, forced to prove his manhood by hunting a wild boar and sharp-tongued Nelly, who supports her family by selling live eels and and the peasant’s daughter, Mogg, who gets a clever lesson in how to save a cow from a greedy landlord. There’s also mud-slinging Barbary (and her noble victim) and Jack, the compassionate half-wit and Alice, the singing shepherdess and and many more. With a deep appreciation for the period and a grand affection for both characters and audience, Laura Amy Schlitz creates twenty-two riveting portraits and linguistic gems equally suited to silent reading or performance. Illustrated with pen-and-ink drawings by Robert Byrd — inspired by the Munich-Nuremberg manuscript, an illuminated poem from thirteenth-century Germany — this witty, historically accurate, and utterly human collection forms an exquisite bridge to the people and places of medieval England. Newbery Medal Winner. —From Candlewick

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  • Joan of Arc

    By: Diane Stanley
    Recommended for grade(s): 5, 6

    Against the fascinating tapestry of France’s history during the Hundred Years’ War, Diane Stanley unfolds the story of the simple thirteen-year-old village girl who in just a few years would lead France to independence from English rule, and thus become a symbol of France’s national pride. It is a story of vision and bravery, fierce determination, and tragic martyrdom. Diane Stanley’s extraordinary gift to present historical information in an accessible and child-friendly format has never been more impressive, nor her skillful, beautifully realized illustrations (here imitating medieval illuminated manuscripts) more exquisite. –From the website at HarperCollins

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 4, 5

    Fish-tory comes to life with two more fin-tastic stories featuring our favorite zombie goldfish Frankie from New York Times-bestselling author Mo O’Hara. When Tom and his best friend rescued Frankie the goldfish from his evil-scientist big brother’s toxic gunge their new pet came back as a BIG FAT ZOMBIE GOLDFISH. Frankie is good at saving the day, but can he become a real knight in shining armor during the medieval day reenactment joust? Then, can the school survive two BIG FAT ZOMBIE GOLDFISH? Find out when Tom’s evil big brother manages to clone a Jurassic Carp! –From the website at Macmillan

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 7

    It is 1202, and thousands of knights and footsoldiers are mustering in Venice for the Fourth Crusade. Among them is young Arthur de Caldicot, squire to Lord Stephen. It is thrilling to be part of this huge gathering and but as Christian falls upon Christian and Saracens draw their scimitars, Arthur’s eyes are opened to the realities of war. Looking into his seeing stone for guidance, he realises that the exploits of King Arthur and his knights, like those of the crusaders, are as grim as they are glorious. Meanwhile Arthur has his own concerns: Gatty, his betrothal, his dream of finding his mother, his relationship with his violent father and his churlish foster-brother. When he finally returns to England, all he has lost and all he has won come together. War, romance, murder, family quarrels, power politics, the conflict between Christianity and Islam: all these are elements in a story packed with drama and colour. Its vivid picture of daily life in medieval times is shot through with earthy comedy and the magic of the Arthurian legends. Darker and deeper than the first two books, this is a marvellous ending to a trilogy that has utterly captivated its readers. —from the website at Hachette

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 4, 5

    Let history come to life – just the way it should be. Read the stories of Gregory the Great, Boniface, Charlemagne, Constantine Methodius, Vladimir, Anselm of Canterbury, Bernard of Clairvaux, Francis of Assisi, Thomas Aquinas, Catherine of Sienna, John Wyclif and John Hus. From people of the Medieval church you can discover how the young Christian church moved on into another era of time. From Gregory I through to Wyclif and Hus you can discover about the crusades and the spread of Islam as well as the beginnings of universities and the Reformation. As the church moves on through the centuries you can see its people struggling against persecution and problems from inside and out.Learn from their mistakes and errors but more importantly learn from their amazing strengths and gifts. Marvel at God’s wonderful care of his people – the church – the Christian church. Written in a modern and relaxed style this is a book that will introduce you to history without the tears and with all the wonder. Extra features throughout this book include looking deeper into issues such as Islam; Division; The crusades; the first university; Creeds and Councils and the Renaissance. –from Christian Focus.

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  • Quidditch Through the Ages

    By: J. K. Rowling
    Recommended for grade(s): 8

    A perennial bestseller in the wizarding world and one of the most popular books in the Hogwarts School library, Quidditch Through the Ages contains all you will ever need to know about the history, the rules – and the breaking of the rules – of the noble sport of Quidditch. Packed with fascinating facts, this definitive guide by the esteemed Quidditch writer Kennilworthy Whisp charts the game’s history from its early origins in the medieval mists on Queerditch Marsh, through to the modern-day sport loved by so many wizard and Muggle families around the world. With comprehensive coverage of famous Quidditch teams, the commonest fouls, the development of racing brooms, and much more, this is a must-have sporting bible for all Harry Potter fans, Quidditch lovers and players, whether the weekend amateur or the seasoned Chudley Cannons season-ticket holder. –From Bloomsbury

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  • The Book of the Lion

    By: Michael Cadnum
    Recommended for grade(s): 7, 8, 9

    Returning to the same era of his “In a Dark Wood”, Cadnum’s majestic novel–part mystery, part history–chronicles the pageantry and brutality of the Crusades under King Richard. Edmund, a young apprentice, is awaiting punishment as a counterfeiter when a knight intervenes on his behalf–and compels Edmund to join Richard Lionheart’s forces in the Holy Land. There, amidst the savagery of the twelfth-century Crusades, Edmund learns both courage and compassion, and discovers that cruelty is sometimes considered the will of Heaven. Set in medieval England and the war-torn shores of the Middle East, Cadnum’s tale weaves together a rich tapestry of storms at sea, the brutality of hand-to-hand combat, and one of the classic horse and lance battles in recorded history–the Battle of Arsuf. National Book Award Finalist. –From Penguin

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  • The Mad Wolf’s Daughter #1

    By: Diane Magras
    Recommended for grade(s): 5

    A Scottish medieval adventure about the youngest in a war-band who must free her family from a castle prison after knights attack her home–with all the excitement of Ranger’s Apprentice and perfect for fans of heroines like Alanna from The Song of the Lioness series. One dark night, Drest’s sheltered life on a remote Scottish headland is shattered when invading knights capture her family, but leave Drest behind. Her father, the Mad Wolf of the North, and her beloved brothers are a fearsome war-band, but now Drest is the only one who can save them. So she starts off on a wild rescue attempt, taking a wounded invader along as a hostage. Hunted by a bandit with a dark link to her family’s past, aided by a witch whom she rescues from the stake, Drest travels through unwelcoming villages, desolate forests, and haunted towns. Every time she faces a challenge, her five brothers speak to her in her mind about courage and her role in the war-band. But on her journey, Drest learns that the war-band is legendary for terrorizing the land. If she frees them, they’ll not hesitate to hurt the gentle knight who’s become her friend. Drest thought that all she wanted was her family back; now she has to wonder what their freedom would really mean. Is she her father’s daughter or is it time to become her own legend? — From Puffin Books

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  • The Midwife’s Apprentice

    By: Karen Cushman
    Recommended for grade(s): 6, 7

    From the author of Catherine, Called Birdy comes another spellbinding novel set in medieval England. The girl known only as Brat has no family, no home, and no future until she meets Jane the Midwife and becomes her apprentice. As she helps the sharp-tempered Jane deliver babies, Brat–who renames herself Alyce–gains knowledge, confidence, and the courage to want something from life: “A full belly, a contented heart, and a place in this world.” Medieval village life makes a lively backdrop for the funny, poignant story of how Alyce gets what she wants. A concluding note discusses midwifery past and present. A Newbery Medal book. Newbery Medal Winner. –From the website at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 6, 7

    On her deathbed, Beaufils’s mother leaves him with a quest and a clue: find your father, a knight of King Arthur’s court. So Beaufils leaves the isolated forest of his youth and quickly discovers that he has much to learn about the world beyond his experience. Beaufils’s innocence never fails to make his companions grin, but his fresh outlook on the world’s peculiarities turns out to be more of a gift than a curse as they encounter unexpected friends and foes. With his constant stream of wise fools and foolish wise men, holy hermits and others of rather less holiness, plotting magicians and conniving Ladies, Gerald Morris infuses these medieval stories with a riotous humor all his own. –From the website at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 5

    The kid-friendly series that makes history approachable, engaging, and funny! From the publishing house that brought you the Who Was? books. The Thrifty Guide to Medieval Times is a snappy, informative, illustrated travel guide with everything the sensible time traveler needs to know, like: Where I can find the best hovel? What are my healthcare options if I catch the Black Plague? How can I avoid being attacked by pillaging Huns? And most importantly, why on earth would anyone want to travel back to medieval times? This book is designed as a parody of Fodor’s guides, complete with humorous maps, reviews of places to stay and top attractions (don’t miss a jousting tournament . . . but watch out for lances!), and tips on whom to have lunch with (murderous Queen Olga of Kiev, naturally–just don’t eat or drink anything around her!). If you had a time travel machine and could take a vacation anywhere in history, this is the only guidebook series you would need. — From Penguin

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 8

    Bestselling author David Elliott explores how Joan of Arc changed the course of history and remains a figure of fascination centuries after her extraordinary life and death. Joan of Arc gets the Hamilton treatment in this evocative novel. Told through medieval poetic forms and in the voices of the people and objects in Joan of Arc’s life, (including her family and even the trees, clothes, cows, and candles of her childhood), Voices offers an unforgettable perspective on an extraordinary young woman. Along the way it explores timely issues such as gender, misogyny, and the peril of speaking truth to power. Before Joan of Arc became a saint, she was a girl inspired. It is that girl we come to know in Voices. — From Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 4, 5

    Marco Polo was seventeen when he set out for China . . . and forty-one when he came back! More than seven hundred years ago, Marco Polo traveled from the medieval city of Venice to the fabled kingdom of the great Kublai Khan, seeing new sights and riches that no Westerner had ever before witnessed. But did Marco Polo experience the things he wrote about . . . or was it all made-up? Young readers are presented with the facts in this entertaining, highly readable Who Was . . . ? biography with black-and-white artwork by John O’Brien. —from the website at Penguin Random House

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 6

    Our TV screens are filled with terrifying images of the walking dead. However, people have been frightened of zombies long before movies and TV shows. This book uncovers the blood-curdling history of the undead—from Viking draugar to dancing Tibetan corpses to medieval revenants that crawled out of the ground, spreading plague and death. This fascinating new title introduces zombie fans to a horrifying host of zombies, both past and present. Packed with gruesome, spine-chilling details, the book takes readers from lurching Ro-langs in Tibet to zombies in 20th century America. Love zombies? Then lock the doors and dare to investigate Zombies Through the Ages! — From Bearport Publishing

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