April 30, 2021

Think you know books?

Which one starts like this? Click on a book below to answer

Dewey Kerrigan sits on the concrete front steps of Mrs. Kovack's house in St. Louis, waiting for her father. He is in Chicago--war work--and she has not seen him since the Fourth of July.
The Green Glass Sea
Ellen Klages

The Green Glass Sea

By: Ellen Klages
Recommended for grade(s): 6, 7

It's 1943, and eleven-year-old Dewey Kerrigan is en route to New Mexico to live with her mathematician father. Soon she arrives at a town that, officially, doesn't exist. It is called Los Alamos, and it is abuzz with activity, as scientists and mathematicians from all over America and Europe work on the biggest secret of all--"the gadget." None of them--not J. Robert Oppenheimer, the director of the Manhattan Project; not the mathematicians and scientists; and least of all, Dewey--know how much "the gadget" is about to change their lives. --From the website at Penguin Random House

Where to Find

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St. Louis Armstrong Beach
Benda Woods

St. Louis Armstrong Beach

By: Benda Woods
Recommended for grade(s): 5, 6

A boy, a dog, and New Orleans' most famous hurricane. Saint is a boy with confidence as big as his name is long. A budding musician, he earns money playing clarinet for the New Orleans tourists, and his best friend is a stray dog named Shadow. At first Saint is sure that Hurricane Katrina will be just like the last one-no big deal. But then the city is ordered to evacuate and Saint refuses to leave without Shadow. Saint and Shadow flee to his neighbor's attic-and soon enough it's up to Saint to save them all. —from the website at Penguin Random House

Where to Find

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A Long Way From Chicago
Richard Peck

A Long Way From Chicago

By: Richard Peck
Recommended for grade(s): 5, 6

Every summer from 1929-1935, in A Long Way from Chicago, Joey Dowdel and his younger sister, Mary Alice, are sent to spend a week with their grandmother in her small Illinois town located halfway between Chicago and St. Louis. Not even the big city crimes of Chicago offer as much excitement as Grandma Dowdel when she outwits the banker, sets illegal fish traps, catches the town's poker playing business men in their underwear, and saves the town from the terror of the Cowgill boys. Now an old man, Joe Dowdel remembers these seven summers and the "larger than life" woman who out-smarted the law and used blackmail to help those in need. A Newbery Honor Book. —from the website at Penguin Random House

Where to Find

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My Father, The Angel Of Death
Ray Villareal

My Father, The Angel Of Death

By: Ray Villareal
Recommended for grade(s): 5

Out of the fog billowing from the regions of the Netherworld steps a gigantic, ominous figure dressed in black. A white, skeleton face peers from the long, hooded cloak draping his massive frame, and in one hand, he clutches a wood-handled scythe with a razor-sharp blade. It's ... the Angel of Death, the American Championship Wrestling Heavyweight Champion! But one of the most popular wrestlers on Monday Night Mayhem is also Mark Baron, Jesse Baron's father. Jesse has just started at yet another new school, this time in San Antonio, and he dreads the moment when the other kids in his seventh-grade class learn who his father is. The reaction will be the same as it was in Omaha, Atlanta, Tampa, St. Louis, and all the other cities he has lived in. They will want to be his "friend" not because they like him, but because they are obsessed with the Angel of Death. When Jesse learns that one of the boys at school—one of his father's biggest fans—doesn't have a father, Jesse realizes that he has never made an effort to get to know his classmates. Could his automatic assumption that other kids are only interested in him because of his father be wrong? Is it possible to make friends, in spite of his father?. —Arte Publico Meanwhile, his parents' relationship is also suffering because of the Angel of Death's celebrity status. The constant moving from city to city, his father's extended absences while on tour with the ACW, and fans who clamor for autographs and photos even during family outings lead to continuous bickering. They have separated once before, and Jesse worries that his mother will leave his dad again. As Jesse negotiates all the usual middle-school problems—from bullies to first love—he can't help but wonder what his life would be like if his father weren't a famous wrestler. Wouldn't things be better if his dad quit the ACW? But would his father be happy leaving a career he loves?. —Arte Publico

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.