April 3, 2020

Think you know books?

Which one starts like this? Click on a book below to answer

Our hero was not one of those Dominican cats everybody's always going on about—he wasn't no home-runner hitter or fly bachetero, not a playboy with a million hots on his jock.
The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao
Junot Diaz

The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

By: Junot Diaz
Recommended for grade(s): College Plus

Oscar is a sweet but disastrously overweight ghetto nerd who—from the New Jersey home he shares with his old world mother and rebellious sister—dreams of becoming the Dominican J. R. R. Tolkien and, most of all, finding love. But Oscar may never get what he wants. Blame the fuk̼—a curse that has haunted Oscar's family for generations, following them on their epic journey from Santo Domingo to the USA. EncapsuLatin/Caribbeang Dominican-American history, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao opens our eyes to an astonishing vision of the contemporary American experience and explores the endless human capacity to persevere—and risk it all—in the name of love. —from the website at Penguin Random House

Where to Find

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Beisbol! Latino Baseball Pioneers And Legends
Jonah Winter

Beisbol! Latino Baseball Pioneers And Legends

By: Jonah Winter
Recommended for grade(s): 4, 5

Baseball, known as America's favorite pastime, is a favorite sport in Latin America as well. In this fascinating and colorfully written collection of profiles, author/illustrator Jonah Winter gives us a guide to Latino heroes, including little known pioneers of the sport. Readers learn stats and anecdotes about fourteen players including Dolf Luque, the Cuban pitcher who became the first Latin American star in the major leagues and Roberto Clemente, the legendary Puerto Rican outfielder of the 1950s and 1960s and and Felipe Alou, the first full-time Dominican star in the majors who later became the first Latin American Manager of the Year. —from the website at Penguin Random House

Where to Find

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How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents
Julia Alvarez

How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents

By: Julia Alvarez
Recommended for grade(s): 9, 10, 11

The Garcías—Dr. Carlos (Papi), his wife Laura (Mami), and their four daughters, Carla, Sandra, Yolanda, and Sofía—belong to the uppermost echelon of Spanish Caribbean society, descended from the conquistadores. Their family compound adjoins the palacio of the dictator's daughter. So when Dr. García's part in a coup attempt is discovered, the family must flee. They arrive in New York City in 1960 to a life far removed from their existence in the Dominican Republic. Papi has to find new patients in the Bronx. Mami, far from the compound and the family retainers, must find herself. Meanwhile, the girls try to lose themselves—by forgetting their Spanish, by straightening their hair and wearing fringed bell bottoms. For them, it is at once liberating and excruciating being caught between the old world and the new, trying to live up to their father's version of honor while accommodating the expectations of their American boyfriends. Acclaimed writer Julia Alvarez's brilliant and buoyant first novel sets the García girls free to tell their most intimate stories about how they came to be at home—and not at home—in America. —From Algonquin

Where to Find

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Dominicana: A Novel
Angie Cruz

Dominicana: A Novel

By: Angie Cruz
Recommended for grade(s): College Plus

Fifteen-year-old Ana Cancion never dreamed of moving to America, the way the girls she grew up with in the Dominican countryside did. But when Juan Ruiz proposes and promises to take her to New York City, she has to say yes. It doesn’t matter that he is twice her age, that there is no love between them. Their marriage is an opportunity for her entire close-knit family to eventually immigrate. So on New Year’s Day, 1965, Ana leaves behind everything she knows and becomes Ana Ruiz, a wife confined to a cold six-floor walk-up in Washington Heights. Lonely and miserable, Ana hatches a reckless plan to escape. But at the bus terminal, she is stopped by Cesar, Juan’s free-spirited younger brother, who convinces her to stay. As the Dominican Republic slides into political turmoil, Juan returns to protect his family’s assets, leaving Cesar to take care of Ana. Suddenly, Ana is free to take English lessons at a local church, lie on the beach at Coney Island, see a movie at Radio City Music Hall, go dancing with Cesar, and imagine the possibility of a different kind of life in America. When Juan returns, Ana must decide once again between her heart and her duty to her family.   --From Flatiron Books

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.