January 9, 2020

You chose Black White and Jewish: Autobiography of a Shifting Self, which is an incorrect answer. The correct answer is...

Skinny Legs and All

By: Tom Robbins
Recommended for grade(s): College Plus
An Arab and a Jew open a restaurant together across the street from the United Nations.... It sounds like the beginning of an ethnic joke, but it's the axis around which spins Tom Robbins's gutsy, fun-loving, and alarmingly provocative new novel, in which a bean can philosophizes, a dessert spoon mystifies, a young waitress takes on the New York art world, and a rowdy redneck welder discovers the lost god of Palestine—while the illusions that obscure humanity's view of the true universe fall away, one by one, like Salome's veils. Skinny Legs and All deals, in Robbins's audacious manner, with today's most sensitive issues: race, politics, marriage, art, religion, money, and lust. It weaves lyrically through what some call the "end days of our planet. Refusing to avert its gaze from the horrors of the apocalypse, it also refuses to let the alleged end of the world spoil its mood. And its mood is defiantly upbeat. —from Penguin Random House
Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

Think you know books?

Which one starts like this? Click on a book below to answer

This is the room of the wolfmother wallpaper. The toadstool motel you once thought a mere folk tale, a corny, obsolete, rural invention. This is the room where your wisest ancestor was born, be you Christian, Arab or Jew. The linoleum underfoot is sacred linoleum. Please remove your shoes.
  • Skinny Legs and All
    Tom Robbins

    Skinny Legs and All

    By: Tom Robbins
    Recommended for grade(s): College Plus

    An Arab and a Jew open a restaurant together across the street from the United Nations.... It sounds like the beginning of an ethnic joke, but it's the axis around which spins Tom Robbins's gutsy, fun-loving, and alarmingly provocative new novel, in which a bean can philosophizes, a dessert spoon mystifies, a young waitress takes on the New York art world, and a rowdy redneck welder discovers the lost god of Palestine—while the illusions that obscure humanity's view of the true universe fall away, one by one, like Salome's veils. Skinny Legs and All deals, in Robbins's audacious manner, with today's most sensitive issues: race, politics, marriage, art, religion, money, and lust. It weaves lyrically through what some call the "end days of our planet. Refusing to avert its gaze from the horrors of the apocalypse, it also refuses to let the alleged end of the world spoil its mood. And its mood is defiantly upbeat. —from Penguin Random House

    Where to Find

    Score a physical copy of the book.

  • Black White and Jewish: Autobiography of a Shifting Self
    Rebecca Walker

    Black White and Jewish: Autobiography of a Shifting Self

    By: Rebecca Walker
    Recommended for grade(s): 11, 12, College Plus

    The Civil Rights movement brought author Alice Walker and lawyer Mel Leventhal together, and in 1969 their daughter, Rebecca, was born. Some saw this unusual copper-colored girl as an outrage or an oddity; others viewed her as a symbol of harmony, a triumph of love over hate. But after her parents divorced, leaving her a lonely only child ferrying between two worlds that only seemed to grow further apart, Rebecca was no longer sure what she represented. In this book, Rebecca Leventhal Walker attempts to define herself as a soul instead of a symbol —and offers a new look at the challenge of personal identity, in a story at once strikingly unique and truly universal. -- From Penguin

    Where to Find

    Score a physical copy of the book.

  • How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?: Being Young and Arab in America
    Moustafa Bayoumi

    How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?: Being Young and Arab in America

    By: Moustafa Bayoumi
    Recommended for grade(s): 9, 10, 11, 12

    An eye-opening look at how young Arab- and Muslim- Americans are forging lives for themselves in a country that often mistakes them for the enemy. Just over a century ago , W.E.B. Du Bois posed a probing question in his classic The Souls of Black Folk: How does it feel to be a problem? Now, Moustafa Bayoumi asks the same about America’s new “problem”-Arab- and Muslim-Americans. Bayoumi takes readers into the lives of seven twenty-somethings living in Brooklyn, home to the largest Arab-American population in the United States. He moves beyond stereotypes and clichés to reveal their often unseen struggles, from being subjected to government surveillance to the indignities of workplace discrimination. Through it all, these young men and women persevere through triumphs and setbacks as they help weave the tapestry of a new society that is, at its heart, purely American. --From the website at Penguin Random House

    Where to Find

    Score a physical copy of the book.

  • Rise of the Wolf (Mark of the Thief #2)
    Jennifer A. Nielson

    Rise of the Wolf (Mark of the Thief #2)

    By: Jennifer A. Nielson
    Recommended for grade(s): 6, 7, 8

    Nic may have escaped enslavement in the mines outside of Rome, but his troubles are far from over. The Praetor War—the battle to destroy Rome from within—is in full force, and Nic is caught in the crossfire. The secretive Praetors are determined to unlock a powerful amulet—one sure to bring the empire to its knees. Worse, the Praetors believe Nic holds the key to finding this amulet, and they will stop at nothing to steal it, even if that means harming the people Nic holds most dear. When the Praetors capture Nic's mother, Nic knows he must do anything to save her. He challenges the Praetors to a chariot race. If he wins, they will release his mother. But if he loses, he must hand over a magic that will certainly destroy Rome and end his own life. Can Nic once again harness his magic and gather the strength to defeat his enemies? Or will he lose his mother and bear witness to Rome's destruction? —from the Scholastic website

    Where to Find

    Score a physical copy of the book.