December 13, 2019

Think you know books?

Which one starts like this? Click on a book below to answer

Son, Last Sunday the host of a popular news show asked me what it meant to lose my body.  
No Country For Old Men
Cormac McCarthy

No Country For Old Men

By: Cormac McCarthy
Recommended for grade(s): 12, College Plus

In No Country for Old Men, Cormac McCarthy simultaneously strips down the American crime novel and broadens its concerns to encompass themes as ancient as the Bible and as bloodily contemporary as this morning's headlines. —from the website at Penguin Random House

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

All You Can Ever Know: A Memoir
Nicole Chung

All You Can Ever Know: A Memoir

By: Nicole Chung
Recommended for grade(s): 11, 12, College Plus

What does it mean to lose your roots—within your culture, within your family—and what happens when you find them? Nicole Chung was born severely premature, placed for adoption by her Korean parents, and raised by a white family in a sheltered Oregon town. From childhood, she heard the story of her adoption as a comforting, prepackaged myth. She believed that her biological parents had made the ultimate sacrifice in the hope of giving her a better life, that forever feeling slightly out of place was her fate as a transracial adoptee. But as Nicole grew up—facing prejudice her adoptive family couldn’t see, finding her identity as an Asian American and as a writer, becoming ever more curious about where she came from—she wondered if the story she’d been told was the whole truth. With warmth, candor, and startling insight, Nicole Chung tells of her search for the people who gave her up, which coincided with the birth of her own child. All You Can Ever Know is a profound, moving chronicle of surprising connections and the repercussions of unearthing painful family secrets—vital reading for anyone who has ever struggled to figure out where they belong. -- From Catapult

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier
Ishmael Beah

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier

By: Ishmael Beah
Recommended for grade(s): 10, 11, 12

This is how wars are fought now: by children, hopped-up on drugs and wielding AK-47s. Children have become soldiers of choice. In the more than fifty conflicts going on worldwide, it is estimated that there are some 300,000 child soldiers. Ishmael Beah used to be one of them. What is war like through the eyes of a child soldier? How does one become a killer? How does one stop? Child soldiers have been profiled by journalists, and novelists have struggled to imagine their lives. But until now, there has not been a first-person account from someone who came through this hell and survived. In A Long Way Gone, Beah, now twenty-five years old, tells a riveting story: how at the age of twelve, he fled attacking rebels and wandered a land rendered unrecognizable by violence. By thirteen, he'd been picked up by the government army, and Beah, at heart a gentle boy, found that he was capable of truly terrible acts. This is a rare and mesmerizing account, told with real literary force and heartbreaking honesty. —from the website at Macmillan

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

Between the World and Me
Ta-Nehisi Coates

Between the World and Me

By: Ta-Nehisi Coates
Recommended for grade(s): 10, 11, 12, College Plus

A father explains to his son the hazards and hopes of growing up a black male in the United States. Winner of the National Book Award. —from the website at Penguin Random House

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.