September 12, 2019

Think you know books?

Which one starts like this? Click on a book below to answer

My parents still think I'm their little girl. I don't want them to see me getting bigger, bigger every week, almost too big to hide it now. But if I don't go home, where can I go? Jason said, You could get rid of it. I thought of how he tossed the broken condom in the trash, saying, Nothing.
Getting Near to Baby
Audrey Couloumbis

Getting Near to Baby

By: Audrey Couloumbis
Recommended for grade(s): 5, 6

Willa Jo and Little Sister are up on the roof at Aunt Patty’s house. Willa Jo went up to watch the sunrise, and Little Sister followed, like she always does. But by mid-morning, they are still up on that roof, and soon it’s clear it wasn’t just the sunrise that brought them there. The trouble is, coming down would mean they’d have to explain, and they just can’t find the words. This is a funny, sometimes heartbreaking, story about sisters, about grief, and about healing. Two girls must come to terms with the death of their baby sister, their mother’s unshakable depression, and the ridiculously controlling aunt who takes them in and means well but just doesn’t understand children. Willa Jo has to try and make things right in their new home, but she and Aunt Patty keep butting heads. Until the morning the two girls climb up to the roof of her house. Aunt Patty tries everything she can think of to get them down, but in the end, the solution is miraculously simple. A Newbery Honor Book. An ALA Notable Book. A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year. --From Penguin

Where to Find

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Keesha's House
Helen Frost

Keesha's House

By: Helen Frost
Recommended for grade(s): 9, 10

An unforgettable narrative collage told in poems Keesha has found a safe place to live, and other kids gravitate to her house when they just can't make it on their own. They are Stephie – pregnant, trying to make the right decisions for herself and those she cares about; Jason – Stephie's boyfriend, torn between his responsibility to Stephie and the baby and the promise of a college basketball career; Dontay – in foster care while his parents are in prison, feeling unwanted both inside and outside the system; Carmen – arrested on a DUI charge, waiting in a juvenile detention center for a judge to hear her case; Harris – disowned by his father after disclosing that he's gay, living in his car, and taking care of himself; Katie – angry at her mother's loyalty to an abusive stepfather, losing herself in long hours of work and school. Stretching the boundaries of traditional poetic forms – sestinas and sonnets – Helen Frost's extraordinary debut novel for young adults weaves together the stories of these seven teenagers as they courageously struggle to hold their lives together and overcome their difficulties. 2004 Michael Printz Honor Book. --from Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Where to Find

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Ask Me How I Got Here
Christine Heppermann

Ask Me How I Got Here

By: Christine Heppermann
Recommended for grade(s): 10, 11, 12

How do you define yourself? By your friends? Your family? Your boyfriend? Your grades? Your trophies? Your choices? By a single choice? From the author of the acclaimed Poisoned Apples comes a novel in verse about a young woman and the aftermath of a life-altering decision. Fans of Laurie Halse Anderson and Ellen Hopkins will find the powerful questions, the difficult truths, and the inner strength that speak to them in Ask Me How I Got Here. Addie has always known what she was running toward, whether in cross country, in her all-girls Catholic school, or in love. Until she and her boyfriend--her sensitive, good-guy boyfriend--are careless one night, and she gets pregnant. Addie makes the difficult choice to have an abortion. And after that--even though she knows it was the right decision for her--nothing is the same. She doesnÕt want anyone besides her parents and her boyfriend to know what happened; she doesn't want to run cross country anymore; she can't bring herself to be excited about anything. Until she reconnects with Juliana, a former teammate who's going through her own dark places. Once again, Christine Heppermann writes with an unflinching honesty and a deep sensitivity about the complexities of being a teenager, being a woman. Her free verse poems are moving, provocative, and often full of wry humor and a sharp wit. --From the website at HarperCollins

Where to Find

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The Pregnancy Project: A Memoir
Gaby Rodriguez

The Pregnancy Project: A Memoir

By: Gaby Rodriguez
Recommended for grade(s): 10, 11, 12

Growing up, Gaby Rodriguez was often told she would end up a teen mom. After all, her mother and her older sisters had gotten pregnant as teenagers; from an outsider's perspective, it was practically a family tradition. Gaby had ambitions that didn't include teen motherhood. But she wondered: how would she be treated if she "lived down" to others' expectations? Would everyone ignore the years she put into being a good student and see her as just another pregnant teen statistic with no future? These questions sparked Gaby's high school senior project: faking her own pregnancy to see how her family, friends, and community would react. What she learned changed her life forever—and made international headlines in the process. In The Pregnancy Project, Gaby details how she was able to fake her own pregnancy—hiding the truth from even her siblings and boyfriend's parents—and reveals all that she learned from the experience. But more than that, Gaby's story is about fighting stereotypes, and how one girl found the strength to come out from the shadow of low expectations to forge a bright future for herself. —from the website of Simon & Schuster

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.