August 14, 2019

Think you know books?

Which one starts like this? Click on a book below to answer

July 1999. One woman stands alone, off to the side of the crowd. She paces back and forth--agitated, excited, impatient.
Me, All Alone, at the End of the World
M.T. Anderson

Me, All Alone, at the End of the World

By: M.T. Anderson
Recommended for grade(s): 4

The boy lives alone at the End of the World, hunting treasure with old maps, finding fossils, whistling tunes, playing ball by the drop. It's a peaceful, contemplative life, and the boy is content. Until, that is, a self-styled Professional Visionary arrives and puts up a sign: CONSTANTINE SHIMMER'S GALVANO-MAGICAL END OF THE WORLD TOURS. FUN ALL THE TIME! Soon men with machines come to pave a clearing for the inn and theme park, and the touring children seem nice, but still. . . . —From Candlewick

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

Alone Atop the Hill: The Autobiography of Alice Dunnigan, Pioneer of the National Black Press
Alice Dunnigan

Alone Atop the Hill: The Autobiography of Alice Dunnigan, Pioneer of the National Black Press

By: Alice Dunnigan
Recommended for grade(s): 11, 12, College Plus

In 1942 Alice Allison Dunnigan, a sharecropper's daughter from Kentucky, made her way to the nation's capitol and a career in journalism that eventually led her to the White House. With Alone atop the Hill, Carol McCabe Booker has condensed Dunnigan's 1974 self-published autobiography to appeal to a general audience and has added scholarly annotations that provide historical context. Dunnigan's dynamic story reveals her importance to the fields of journalism, women's history, and the civil rights movement and creates a compelling portrait of a ground-breaking American. Dunnigan recounts her formative years in rural Kentucky as she struggled for a living, telling bluntly and simply what life was like in a Border State in the first half of the twentieth century. Later she takes readers to Washington, D.C., where we see her rise from a typist during World War II to a reporter. Ultimately she would become the first black female reporter accredited to the White House; to travel with a U.S. president; credentialed by the House and Senate Press Galleries; accredited to the Department of State and the Supreme Court; voted into the White House Newswomen's Association and the Women's National Press Club; and recognized as a Washington sports reporter. A contemporary of Helen Thomas and a forerunner of Ethel Payne, Dunnigan travelled with President Truman on his coast-to-coast, whistle-stop tour; was the first reporter to query President Eisenhower about civil rights; and provided front-page coverage for more than one hundred black newspapers of virtually every race issue before the Congress, the federal courts, and the presidential administration. Here she provides an uninhibited, unembellished, and unvarnished look at the terrain, the players, and the politics in a rough-and-tumble national capital struggling to make its way through a nascent, post-war racial revolution. -- From University of Georgia Press

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared To Dream
Tanya Lee Stone

Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared To Dream

By: Tanya Lee Stone
Recommended for grade(s): 5

What does it take to be an astronaut? Excellence at flying, courage, intelligence, resistance to stress, top physical shape —From any checklist would include these. But when America created NASA in 1958, there was another unspoken rule: you had to be a man. Here is the tale of thirteen women who proved that they were not only as tough as the toughest man but also brave enough to challenge the government. They were blocked by prejudice, jealousy, and the scrawled note of one of the most powerful men in Washington. But even though the Mercury 13 women did not make it into space, they did not lose, for their example empowered young women to take their place in the sky, piloting jets and commanding space capsules. ALMOST ASTRONAUTS is the story of thirteen true pioneers of the space age. A finalist for the YALSA Excellence in Nonfiction Award 2010. —From Candlewick

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

Sonia Sotomayor: A Judge Grows in the Bronx/La juez que creció en el Bronx
Jonah Winter

Sonia Sotomayor: A Judge Grows in the Bronx/La juez que creció en el Bronx

By: Jonah Winter
Recommended for grade(s): 3, 4

The inspiring and timely story of Sonia Sotomayor, who rose up from a childhood of poverty and prejudice to become the first Latino to be nominated to the US Supreme Court. Before Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor took her seat in our nation's highest court, she was just a little girl in the South Bronx. Justice Sotomayor didn't have a lot growing up, but she had what she needed -- her mother's love, a will to learn, and her own determination. With bravery she became the person she wanted to be. With hard work she succeeded. With little sunlight and only a modest plot from which to grow, Justice Sotomayor bloomed for the whole world to see. Antes de que la magistrada de la Corte Suprema Sonia Sotomayor llegara al máximo tribunal de nuestra nación, no era más que una niñita en el South Bronx. La magistrada Sotomayor no tuvo mucho durante sus primeros años, pero sí tuvo lo que contaba -- el amor de su madre, la voluntad de aprender y su propia determinación. Con valentía se hizo la persona que quería ser. Con trabajo arduo triunfó. Con un poquito de sol en un solarcito donde crecer, la magistrada Sotomayor floreció para que todo el mundo la vea. --From the website at Simon & Schuster

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.