July 17, 2019

Think you know books?

Which one starts like this? Click on a book below to answer

I would never have gone after my mother with a knife, not when a credit card is cleaner and cut just as deep. It's not like I was going after her at all--mostly what I wanted was to get as far away from her as possible, and her wife's wallet was sitting on the dining room table with the mail, just waiting to be opened.
Fist Stick Knife Gun
Geoffrey Canada

Fist Stick Knife Gun

By: Geoffrey Canada
Recommended for grade(s): 11, 12

Long before the avalanche of praise for his work from Oprah Winfrey, from President Bill Clinton, from President Barack Obama long before he became known for his talk show appearances, Members Project spots, and documentaries like Waiting for "Superman", Geoffrey Canada was a small boy growing up scared on the mean streets of the South Bronx. His childhood world was one where "sidewalk boys" learned the codes of the block and were ranked through the rituals of fist, stick, and knife. Then the streets changed, and the stakes got even higher. In his candid and riveting memoir, Canada relives a childhood in which violence stalked every street corner. —From Beacon Press

Where to Find

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The Impossible Knife of Memory
Laurie Halse Anderson

The Impossible Knife of Memory

By: Laurie Halse Anderson
Recommended for grade(s): 9, 10, 11, 12

For the past five years, Hayley Kincaid and her father, Andy, have been on the road, never staying long in one place as he struggles to escape the demons that have tortured him since his return from Iraq. Now they are back in the town where he grew up so Hayley can attend school. Perhaps, for the first time, Hayley can have a normal life, put aside her own painful memories, even have a relationship with Finn, the hot guy who obviously likes her but is hiding secrets of his own. Will being back home help Andy's PTSD, or will his terrible memories drag him to the edge of hell, and drugs push him over? The Impossible Knife of Memory is Laurie Halse Anderson at her finest: compelling, surprising, and impossible to put down.

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

Money Hungry
Sharon Flake

Money Hungry

By: Sharon Flake
Recommended for grade(s): 5, 6, 7, 8

Thirteen-year-old Raspberry Hill is always scheming about ways to make money. She's starved for the green stuff, and will do just about anything legal to get it-wash cars, sell rotten candy, skip lunch, and clean houses. She is obsessed with making money, having money, smelling money, and touching money. Raspberry is determined that she and her momma will never be homeless again. When they are approved for a Section 8 move to a nice house in Pecan Landings, Raspberry thinks things are looking up. But after their apartment in the projects is robbed, and protest by the rich folks in Pecan Landings force them out of their new house, Raspberry must do everything in her power to keep her world from crumbling. Coretta Scott King Honor Book 2002.  —from the website at Disney

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

American Girls: A Novel
Alison Umminger

American Girls: A Novel

By: Alison Umminger
Recommended for grade(s): 8, 9

A bittersweet, honest, and widely acclaimed YA coming-of-age novel that distills honest truths about American girldom. Anna is a fifteen-year-old girl slouching toward adulthood, and she's had it with her life at home. So Anna "borrows" her stepmom's credit card and runs away to Los Angeles, where her half-sister takes her in. But LA isn't quite the glamorous escape Anna had imagined. As Anna spends her days on TV and movie sets, she engrosses herself in a project researching the murderous Manson girls—and although the violence in her own life isn't the kind that leaves physical scars, she begins to notice the parallels between herself and the lost girls of LA, and of America, past and present. In Anna's singular voice, we glimpse not only a picture of life on the B-list in LA, but also a clear-eyed reflection on being young, vulnerable, lost, and female in America—in short, on the B-list of life. Alison Umminger writes about girls, violence, and which people society deems worthy of caring about, which ones it doesn't, in a way not often seen in teen fiction. -- From Flatiron Books

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.