May 30, 2019

Think you know books?

Which one starts like this? Click on a book below to answer

At only eleven years of age, I was a cyber ho. Looking back, I'm embarassed. For me. For my parents. But oddly enough, my cyber social debauchery is indirectly correlated with my current status as a so-called internet pioneer.
Letters to a Bullied Girl
Olivia Gardner

Letters to a Bullied Girl

By: Olivia Gardner
Recommended for grade(s): 8, 9, 10, 11

Olivia Gardner, a northern California teenager, was severely taunted and cyber-bullied by her classmates for more than two years. News of her bullying spread, eventually reaching two teenage girls from a neighboring town, sisters Emily and Sarah Buder. The girls were so moved by Olivia's story that they initiated a letter-writing campaign to help lift her spirits. It was a tender gesture of solidarity that set off an overwhelming chain reaction of support, encouragement, and love. In Letters to a Bullied Girl, Olivia and the Buder sisters share an inspiring selection of messages that arrived from across America—the personal, often painful remembrances of former targets, remorseful bullies, and sympathetic bystanders. Letters to a Bullied Girl examines our national bullying epidemic from a variety of angles and perspectives, and includes practical guidance from bullying expert Barbara Coloroso, author of The Bully, the Bullied, and the Bystander. Though addressed to Olivia, the letters speak to all young people who have been bullied, offer advice and hope to those who suffer, and provide a wake-up call to all who have ever been involved in bullying. —from the HarperCollins website

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

Brain Jack
Brian Falkner

Brain Jack

By: Brian Falkner
Recommended for grade(s): 8

Fans of Cory Doctorow's Little Brother and M. T. Anderson's Feed will love this high-octane cyber thriller. In a dystopian near-future, neuro-headsets have replaced computer keyboards. Just slip on a headset, and it's the Internet at the speed of thought. For teen hacker Sam Wilson, a headset is a must. But as he masters the new technology, he has a terrifying realization. If anything on his computer is vulnerable to an attack, what happens when his mind is linked to the system? Could consciousness itself be hacked? Brian Falkner, author of The Tomorrow Code and The Project, delivers an action-packed and thought-provoking sci-fi thriller in which logging on to a computer could mean the difference between life and death. -- From Ember

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

The Dark Game: True Spy Stories from Invisible Ink to CIA Moles
Paul B. Janeczko

The Dark Game: True Spy Stories from Invisible Ink to CIA Moles

By: Paul B. Janeczko
Recommended for grade(s): 9

From clothesline codes to surveillance satellites and cyber espionage, Paul B. Janeczko uncovers two centuries’ worth of true spy stories in U.S. history. Ever since George Washington used them to help topple the British, spies and their networks have helped and hurt America at key moments in history. In this fascinating collection, Paul B. Janeczko probes such stories as that of Elizabeth Van Lew, an aristocrat whose hatred of slavery drove her to be one of the most successful spies in the Civil War; the "Choctaw code talkers," Native Americans who were instrumental in sending secret messages during World War I; the staggering engineering behind a Cold War tunnel into East Berlin to tap Soviet phones (only to be compromised by a Soviet mole); and many more famous and less-known examples. Colorful personalities, daring missions, the feats of the loyal, and the damage of traitors are interspersed with a look at the technological advances that continue to change the rules of gathering intelligence. -- From Candlewick Press

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl
Issa Rae

The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl

By: Issa Rae
Recommended for grade(s): 11, 12, College Plus

My name is 'J' and I'm awkward--and black. Someone once told me those were the two worst things anyone could be. That someone was right. Where do I start?" Being an introvert and a nerd in a world that glorifies cool isn't easy. But when Issa Rae, the creator of the Shorty Award-winning hit series The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl, is that introvert--whether she's navigating love, work, friendships, or rapping-- it sure is entertaining. Now, in this debut collection of essays written in her witty and self-deprecating voice, Rae covers everything from cybersexing in the early days of the Internet to deflecting unsolicited comments on weight gain, from navigating the perils of eating out alone and public displays of affection to learning to accept yourself --natural hair and all.  --From Simon & Schuster

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.