May 10, 2019

Think you know books?

Which one starts like this? Click on a book below to answer

Mr. and Mrs. Dursley, of number four, Privet Drive, were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much. They were the last people you would expect to be involved in anything strange or mysterious, because they just didn't hold with such nonsense.
A Strange Place to Call Home: The World’s Most Dangerous Habitats, and the Animals That Call Them Home
Marilyn Singer and Ed Young

A Strange Place to Call Home: The World’s Most Dangerous Habitats, and the Animals That Call Them Home

By: Marilyn Singer and Ed Young
Recommended for grade(s): 3, 4

Under the desert’s cracked and barren skin, spadefoot toads are waiting for rain. In the endless black of the deepest caves, blind fish find their way. Even in the frozen hearts of glaciers, ice worms by the billion flourish. In this fascinating look at fourteen animals who defy the odds by thriving in Earth’s most dangerous places, renowned poet Marilyn Singer and celebrated artist Ed Young show that of all the miracles of life, it is life’s persistence that astounds the most. --From Chronicle

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (Harry Potter #1)
J. K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (Harry Potter #1)

By: J. K. Rowling
Recommended for grade(s): 6, 7, 8, 9

One day just before his eleventh birthday, an owl tries to deliver a mysterious letter—the first of a sequence of events that end in Harry meeting a giant man named Hagrid. Hagrid explains Harry's history to him: When he was a baby, the Dark wizard, Lord Voldemort, attacked and killed his parents in an attempt to kill Harry; but the only mark on Harry was a mysterious lightning-bolt scar on his forehead. Now he has been invited to attend Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, where the headmaster is the great wizard Albus Dumbledore. Harry visits Diagon Alley to get his school supplies, especially his very own wand. To get to school, he takes the Hogwarts Express from platform nine and three-quarters at King's Cross Station. On the train, he meets two fellow students who will become his closest friends: Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger. Harry is assigned to Gryffindor House at Hogwarts, and soon becomes the youngest-ever Seeker on the House Quidditch team. He also studies Potions with Professor Severus Snape, who displays a deep and abiding dislike for Harry, and Defense Against the Dark Arts with nervous Professor Quirrell; he and his friends defeat a mountain troll, help Hagrid raise a dragon, and explore the wonderful, fascinating world of Hogwarts. But all events lead irrevocably toward a second encounter with Lord Voldemort, who seeks an object of legend known as the Sorcerer's Stone... —From Scholasic

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

Lulu's Mysterious Mission (Lulu #3)
Judith Viorst

Lulu's Mysterious Mission (Lulu #3)

By: Judith Viorst
Recommended for grade(s): 3, 4

Lulu has put her tantrum-throwing days behind her. That is, until her parents announce that they are going on vacationÑWITHOUT LULU. Not only that, but they are leaving her with the formidable Ms. Sonia Sofia Solinsky, who says hello by bellowing, ÒThe Eagle has landed,Ó and smiles at you with the kind of smile that an alligator might give you before eating you for dinner. The second her parents are out of the house, Lulu tries out several elaborate schemes to bring them straight back. But just when she seems to finally be making some headway, her babysitter reveals an astonishing secretÉone that has Lulu crossing her fingers that her parents will go on vacation all the timeÑwithout her! --From the website at Simon & Schuster

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

Strange Mr. Satie
M. T. Anderson

Strange Mr. Satie

By: M. T. Anderson
Recommended for grade(s): 3, 4

At first glance, Erik Satie looked as normal as anyone else in Paris one hundred years ago. Beyond his shy smile, however, was a mind like no other. When Satie sat down at the piano to compose or play music, his tunes were strange and dreamlike, his melodies topsy-turvy and discordant. Many people hated his music. Few understood it. But to Erik Satie there was sense in nonsense, and the vibrant, surreal compositions of this eccentric man-child would go on to influence many artists. --From the website at Candlewick Press

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.