April 25, 2019

Think you know books?

Which one starts like this? Click on a book below to answer

"I remember this little place next to the bus station that sold the best hot dogs I ever ate," said Charlie Epps, who was a child in the 1940's in Windsor, North Carolina.
Miles to Go for Freedom: Segregation and Civil Rights in the Jim Crow Years
Linda Barrett Osborne

Miles to Go for Freedom: Segregation and Civil Rights in the Jim Crow Years

By: Linda Barrett Osborne
Recommended for grade(s): 7, 8

Told through unforgettable first-person accounts, photographs, and other primary sources, this book is an overview of racial segregation and early civil rights efforts in the United States from the 1890s to 1954, a period known as the Jim Crow years. Multiple perspectives are examined as the book looks at the impact of legal segregation and discrimination on the day-to-day life of black and white Americans across the country. Complete with a bibliography and an index, this book is an important addition to black history books for young readers. --from Abrams.

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

Black Like Me
John Howard Griffin

Black Like Me

By: John Howard Griffin
Recommended for grade(s): 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

In the Deep South of the 1950s, journalist John Howard Griffin decided to cross the color line. Using medication that darkened his skin to deep brown, he exchanged his privileged life as a Southern white man for the disenfranchised world of an unemployed black man. His audacious, still chillingly relevant eyewitness history is a work about race and humanity-that in this new millennium still has something important to say to every American. —from the website at Penguin Random House

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

Courage Has No Color: The True Story of the Triple Nickles : America's First Black Paratroopers
Tanya Lee Stone

Courage Has No Color: The True Story of the Triple Nickles : America's First Black Paratroopers

By: Tanya Lee Stone
Recommended for grade(s): 8, 9

World War II is raging, and thousands of American soldiers are fighting overseas against the injustices brought on by Hitler. Back on the home front, the injustice of discrimination against African Americans plays out as much on Main Street as in the military. Enlisted black men are segregated from white soldiers and regularly relegated to service duties. At Fort Benning, Georgia, First Sergeant Walter Morris's men serve as guards at The Parachute School, while the white soldiers prepare to be paratroopers. Morris knows that for his men to be treated like soldiers, they have to train and act like them, but would the military elite and politicians recognize the potential of these men as well as their passion for serving their country? Tanya Lee Stone examines the role of African Americans in the military through the history of the Triple Nickles, America's first black paratroopers, who fought in a little-known attack on the American West by the Japanese. The 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion, in the words of Morris, "proved that the color of a man had nothing to do with his ability." Finalist for the YALSA Excellence in Nonfiction Award 2014. --from Candlewick.

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

A Dream Of Freedom: The Civil Rights Movement From 1954 To 1968
Diane McWhorter

A Dream Of Freedom: The Civil Rights Movement From 1954 To 1968

By: Diane McWhorter
Recommended for grade(s): 8

In this history of the modern Civil Rights movement, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Diane McWhorter focuses on the monumental events that occurred between 1954 (the year of Brown versus the Board of Education) and 1968 (the year that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assasinated). Beginning with an overview of the movement since the end of the Civil War, McWhorter also discusses such events as the 1956 MTGS bus boycott, the 1961 Freedom Rides, and the 1963 demonstration in Birmingham, Alabama, among others. —from the Scholastic website

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.