April 4, 2019

Think you know books?

Which one starts like this? Click on a book below to answer

I remember falling. At least I think I do. Or maybe that's just because I know I fell. The grass is far away--until it isn't anymore. Somebody screams--wait, it's me. 
Finding Mighty
Sheela Chari

Finding Mighty

By: Sheela Chari
Recommended for grade(s): 4, 5

Along the train lines north of New York City, twelve-year-old neighbors Myla and Peter search for the link between Myla’s necklace and the disappearance of Peter’s brother, Randall. Thrown into a world of parkour, graffiti, and diamond-smuggling, Myla and Peter encounter a band of thugs who are after the same thing as Randall. Can Myla and Peter find Randall before it’s too late, and their shared family secrets threaten to destroy them all? Drawing on urban art forms and local history, Finding Mighty is a mystery that explores the nature of art and the unbreakable bonds of family. --from Abrams.

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

Restart
Gordon Korman

Restart

By: Gordon Korman
Recommended for grade(s): 5

Chase's memory just went out the window. Chase doesn't remember falling off the roof. He doesn't remember hitting his head. He doesn't, in fact, remember anything. He wakes up in a hospital room and suddenly has to learn his whole life all over again . . . starting with his own name. He knows he's Chase. But who is Chase? When he gets back to school, he sees that different kids have very different reactions to his return. Some kids treat him like a hero. Some kids are clearly afraid of him. One girl in particular is so angry with him that she pours her frozen yogurt on his head the first chance she gets. Pretty soon, it's not only a question of who Chase is--it's a question of who he was . . . and who he's going to be. From the #1 bestselling author of Swindle and Slacker, Restart is the spectacular story of a kid with a messy past who has to figure out what it means to get a clean start. -- From Scholastic Inc.

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

Rex Zero and the End of the World
Tim Wynne-Jones

Rex Zero and the End of the World

By: Tim Wynne-Jones
Recommended for grade(s): 6

Why does everyone seem so scared? That's what the new boy in town, Rex Norton-Norton, aka Rex Zero, wonders as he rides his bike through Ottawa's streets. Is it spies? Kidnappers? Or is it because of the shadowy creature some say is stalking Adams Park? One thing is certain in this summer of 1962 as the Cold War heats up: nothing is quite what it seems. What's a boy to do? If his name is Rex Zero and he has a bike he calls "Diablo," five wild and funny siblings, an alpha dog named Kincho, a basement bomb shelter built of old Punch magazines, and a mind that turns everything inside out, he's bound to come up with an amazing idea. With its mystery, adventure, laugh-out-loud scenes of family chaos, and underlying message of hope, this wonderfully original novel from Tim Wynne-Jones explores the impact of doomsday on the imagination of one smart and funny twelve-year-old boy. --From Groundwood Books

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

Room One: A Mystery Or Two
Andrew Clements

Room One: A Mystery Or Two

By: Andrew Clements
Recommended for grade(s): 5

Ted Hammond loves a good mystery, and in the spring of his fifth-grade year, he's working on a big one. How can his school in the little town of Plattsford stay open next year if there are going to be only five students? Out here on the Great Plains in western Nebraska, everyone understands that if you lose the school, you lose the town. But the mystery that has Ted's full attention at the moment is about that face, the face he sees in the upper window of the Andersons' house as he rides past on his paper route. The Andersons moved away two years ago, and their old farmhouse is empty, boarded up tight. At least it's supposed to be. A shrinking school in a dying town. A face in the window of an empty house. At first these facts don't seem to be related. But Ted Hammond learns that in a very small town, there's no such thing as an isolated event. And the solution of one mystery is often the beginning of another. —from the website of Simon & Schuster

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.