February 22, 2019

Think you know books?

Which one starts like this? Click on a book below to answer

What's surprised me most about seeing my sister dead is the lingering smirk on her face. Her pale lips are turned up ever so slightly, and someone has filled in her patchy eyebrows with a black pencil. The top half of her face is angry--like she's ready to stab someone--and the bottom half is almost smug. This is not the Olga I knew. Olga was as meek and fragile as a baby bird.
I am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter
Erika L. Sanchez

I am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter

By: Erika L. Sanchez
Recommended for grade(s): 10, 11, 12

Perfect Mexican daughters do not go away to college. And they do not move out of their parents' house after high school graduation. Perfect Mexican daughters never abandon their family. But Julia is not your perfect Mexican daughter. That was Olga's role. Then a tragic accident on the busiest street in Chicago leaves Olga dead and Julia left behind to reassemble the shattered pieces of her family. And no one seems to acknowledge that Julia is broken, too. Instead, her mother seems to channel her grief into pointing out every possible way Julia has failed. But it's not long before Julia discovers that Olga might not have been as perfect as everyone thought. With the help of her best friend Lorena, and her first kiss, first love, first everything boyfriend Connor, Julia is determined to find out. Was Olga really what she seemed? Or was there more to her sister's story? And either way, how can Julia even attempt to live up to a seemingly impossible ideal? National Book Award Finalist. --From the website at Penguin Random House

Where to Find

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#Not Your Princess: Voices of Native American Women
Lisa Charleyboy and Mary Beth Leatherdale

#Not Your Princess: Voices of Native American Women

By: Lisa Charleyboy and Mary Beth Leatherdale
Recommended for grade(s): 10

Whether looking back to a troubled past or welcoming a hopeful future, the powerful voices of Indigenous women across North America resound in this book. In the same style as the best-selling Dreaming in Indian, #Not Your Princess presents an eclectic collection of poems, essays, interviews, and art that combine to express the experience of being a Native woman. Stories of abuse, humiliation, and stereotyping are countered by the voices of passionate women making themselves heard and demanding change. Sometimes angry, often reflective, but always strong, the women in this book will give teen readers insight into the lives of women who, for so long, have been virtually invisible. -- From Annick Press

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

My Sister Lives on the Mantelpiece
Annabel Pitcher

My Sister Lives on the Mantelpiece

By: Annabel Pitcher
Recommended for grade(s): 7, 8

My sister Rose lives on the mantelpiece. Well, some of her does. A collarbone, two ribs, a bit of skull, and a little toe. To ten-year-old Jamie, his family has fallen apart because of the loss of someone he barely remembers: his sister Rose, who died five years ago in a terrorist bombing. To his father, life is impossible to make sense of when he lives in a world that could so cruelly take away a ten-year-old girl. To Rose's surviving fifteen year old twin, Jas, everyday she lives in Rose's ever present shadow, forever feeling the loss like a limb, but unable to be seen for herself alone. Told with warmth and humor, this powerful novel is a sophisticated take on one family's struggle to make sense of the loss that's torn them apart... and their discovery of what it means to stay together. --from Little, Brown Books.

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.

I Love I Hate I Miss My Sister
Amélie Sarn

I Love I Hate I Miss My Sister

By: Amélie Sarn
Recommended for grade(s): 7

For readers of The Tyrant's Daughter, Out of Nowhere, and I Am Malala, this poignant story about two Muslim sisters is about love, loss, religion, forgiveness, women's rights, and freedom. Two sisters. Two lives. One future. Sohane loves no one more than her beautiful, carefree younger sister, Djelila. And she hates no one as much. They used to share everything. But now, Djelila is spending more time with her friends, partying, and hanging out with boys, while Sohane is becoming more religious. When Sohane starts wearing a head scarf, her school threatens to expel her. Meanwhile, Djelila is harassed by neighborhood bullies for not being Muslim enough. Sohane can't help thinking that Djelila deserves what she gets. But she never could have imagined just how far things would go. . . . -- From Ember

Where to Find

Score a physical copy of the book.